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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
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    Aberdeenshire
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    Country: Great Britain

    Default And now for Something Different!

    SAFE BREAKING - OLD STYLE

    Around 1910 the Chatwood Safe Company published a Booklet called "The Modern Burglar" which included this illustration of the ripping method. Any safe, even bent body types, of less than " wrought iron or steel thickness could be breached by ripping.

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    The method was universally successful on the basic safes of the day. The display items above were dedicated to Alexandrov, a well known Soviet Union cracksman. The quality of the tools he used were brilliantly made. Easily concealed and assembled on site with spike and lever attachments.

    The burglary on the right is typical of a crime scene of the time. (London Bus Company)

    The Police Forensic Departments held dozens of sample jars of the various types of sawdust fillings which led to the conviction of many burglars who had failed to dust themselves down.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
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    Cleveland, Ohio USA
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    Country: United States

    Default

    Here in the States, that technique is usually known as peeling. I will never forget the job where the whole outer area around the lock and handle was torn open exposing the lock itself and the boltwork cam plate blocked by the lock bolt. I mean it was right there in full view and yet the safe was not breached. Here was a case where the midnight shift worker(s) just did not understand what they were looking at.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    34
    Country: UK

    Default

    I've always know that attack as peeling. There are interesting photos online of poor locked-out Russians doing that same attack on their modern high security steel doors. Some are definitely not their own doors! They simply use a salmon can opener, which is apparently sturdy enough to do the job, despite being rather smaller.

    As regards the "So nearly breached" safe, I did one after-burglary opening where the two safes had been beaten with a sledgehammer. They were only toy digital safes, and one had failed under the attack. The other could not be opened, as the keypad had exploded under the attack. I literally depressed the solenoid bolt by twisting the destroyed, punched mostly through, override lock with my fingers.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
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    Edinburgh
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    245
    Country: UK

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by NigelKTolley View Post
    I've always know that attack as peeling. There are interesting photos online of poor locked-out Russians doing that same attack on their modern high security steel doors. Some are definitely not their own doors! They simply use a salmon can opener, which is apparently sturdy enough to do the job, despite being rather smaller.
    There is a Yt vid of a chinese composite door and a teenage girl ripping the plastic outer skin with a domestic tinopener:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XoUg94gvLdM
    This vid has become notorious in Russia. Shows you get what you pay for, especially from China. Cheap chinese copies compare unfavorably with substantial russian-made doors. But not all chinese doors are like this, they do make some good ones too.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
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    37
    Country: Australia

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    Quote Originally Posted by safeman View Post
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Where was this photo taken?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
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    Aberdeenshire
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    Country: Great Britain

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    Quote Originally Posted by Garry Wilson View Post
    Where was this photo taken?
    The correspondent was from Ukraine but it could have been taken in Russia.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    37
    Country: Australia

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    Quote Originally Posted by safeman View Post
    The correspondent was from Ukraine but it could have been taken in Russia.
    Thanks, I was hoping it was in UK somewhere, then I could have a squiz on my next visit when we can finally travel again.

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