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Thread: Safe

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2014
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    Carlisle, England.
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    Country: England

    Default Safe

    Here’s a safe plaque specifically for safeman ! Just in case you’ve never seen it before. Enjoy 😊
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails FD0BB897-C594-4D51-B778-202B9C69B684.jpeg  

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
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    Aberdeenshire
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    Country: Great Britain

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    Quote Originally Posted by Warren63 View Post
    Here’s a safe plaque specifically for safeman ! Just in case you’ve never seen it before. Enjoy 😊
    Warren, this is very kind of you, many thanks. Memory time again.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Fisher 3.JPG 
Views:	11 
Size:	289.2 KB 
ID:	22493 Here is my Grandfather's earliest plate when he started the business in 1934 when he was 65 years old. Wisely he used the term 'Resisting' but I don't know what was on his mind when he included 'Damp'. He started his working life as an umbrella maker so perhaps this had an influence in all his thinking.

    The word Sedgley refers to the company who made his safes. Wm.E Lee & Son of Bridge St. in a tiny workshop in that town. The workforce was father and son. The Plant comprised a light bending machine and shear, a pile of light steel plates and a bin of sawdust and alum crystals. A pot of maroon paint expertly applied created very attractive safes made to any size.

    Later we were appointed as agents for the Ratner Safe Co. in Scotland and Northern Ireland.
    Real safes.

    Thanks again Warren with Best Wishes for Christmas, the New Year, and vaccination.

    John.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
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    Devon UK
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    Country: UK

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    Quote Originally Posted by safeman View Post
    Warren, this is very kind of you, many thanks. Memory time again.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Fisher 3.JPG 
Views:	11 
Size:	289.2 KB 
ID:	22493 Here is my Grandfather's earliest plate when he started the business in 1934 when he was 65 years old. Wisely he used the term 'Resisting' but I don't know what was on his mind when he included 'Damp'. He started his working life as an umbrella maker so perhaps this had an influence in all his thinking.

    The word Sedgley refers to the company who made his safes. Wm.E Lee & Son of Bridge St. in a tiny workshop in that town. The workforce was father and son. The Plant comprised a light bending machine and shear, a pile of light steel plates and a bin of sawdust and alum crystals. A pot of maroon paint expertly applied created very attractive safes made to any size.

    Later we were appointed as agents for the Ratner Safe Co. in Scotland and Northern Ireland.
    Real safes.

    Thanks again Warren with Best Wishes for Christmas, the New Year, and vaccination.

    John.
    well unless he put a rubber seal on the back of the door (which would be pretty silly when you are adding alum) the umbrella thing must be it! It had certainly confused me until now
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 5E99F3DF-4280-4E0F-B988-BE82FE2BEAA5.jpeg  

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Aberdeenshire
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    585
    Country: Great Britain

    Exclamation Dampness.

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Gordon View Post
    well unless he put a rubber seal on the back of the door (which would be pretty silly when you are adding alum) the umbrella thing must be it! It had certainly confused me until now
    Not only the umbrella Tom, his father was a Hatter and maybe the suggestion for the term came from him. No matter, it's all in the name of sensible protection.
    Regards, John.

  5. #5
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    Oct 2009
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    Here in the U.S., dampness was a huge problem with the early fire safe makers. And not just with a concern of moisture affecting the contents. I have owned a couple early safes from around 1850's where the outer steel shells have been heavily rusted through due the included moisture content.

  6. #6
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    Sep 2007
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    Aberdeenshire
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doug MacQueen View Post
    Here in the U.S., dampness was a huge problem with the early fire safe makers. And not just with a concern of moisture affecting the contents. I have owned a couple early safes from around 1850's where the outer steel shells have been heavily rusted through due the included moisture content.
    Hello again Doug,

    Not the same problem but may also be causing damage to contents in your part of the world.

    I think I may be repeating myself - again. My company was being claimed as being responsible for mould damage to a lady’s tiara, well, the velvet head band which had been affected by mould which thrives on condensation caused by a concrete body filled safe being opened and closed long enough to allow an increase the inside temperature and then closed and remaining closed for some period of time.
    The warm air condensed in the cool temperature of the safe over time causing the mould to form. The Dew Point.
    In a similar vein, we also had a similar problem with a strongroom cast in-situ within a private dwelling and containing valuable shotguns and paintings. What I learned from that is that a concrete strongroom wall takes an extremely long time to dry out – something like an inch a month. From a security point of view such concrete would not reach its specified security strength for at least a year. When the damage was discovered special wall fittings containing desiccant crystals had to be made and the crystals dried out frequently until the ambient humidity level was attained.

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