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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Posts
    41
    Country: United States

    Default MacNeale Safe Lock Set Screw / Spline Key

    Iíve attached links to a MacNeale safe lock that is missing a spline key/set screw meant to hold the dial shaft to the drive wheel. Itís possible the spline key was drilled out or alternatively itís just missing the set screw. I believe the latter is the case as the bottom of the hole where the set screw would go is threaded on both the dial shaft side as well as the drive wheel inner hole. The hole does have a taper - itís wider at the top and narrower as it fits into the threads between the drive shaft and the drive wheel.

    If someone has a picture of a MacNeale lock with a set screw, can they post a picture as Iím going to need to fabricate one.

    I had trouble getting my Imgur pictures to link so Iím just going to post the Imgur URLs.

    https://i.imgur.com/xQLoP4h.jpg

    https://i.imgur.com/2CDWmqA.jpg

    https://i.imgur.com/hmVrVcl.jpg

    https://i.imgur.com/VlyKBUd.jpg

    https://i.imgur.com/AIRUGFb.jpg

    https://i.imgur.com/RwttOVG.jpg

    Also, my lock case is stamped M & U 271. Is this the lock type? The top of the case (to which the wheel pack screws in) is stamped 272.

    Thank you.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Cleveland, Ohio USA
    Posts
    1,399
    Country: United States

    Default

    A picture of the set screw is not going to be much of a help as the tapered section of the hole should ideally be matched by the taper of the set screw. If the taper of the screw is greater the screw won't fit into the threaded portion, if the taper is less it will fit in the threaded portion but will have some slop. Matching that from a picture will be a challenge I think. Next the threaded portion which Is likely without any taper may not be anywhere near a standard modern thread size given the era the lock was made. There is no doubt that is the original factory method of attachment and never had a spline key. If I was making one, I would first deal with duplicating only the taper until it is a reasonably close fit. Then work on making just a straight screw to get the threaded portion correct. Then make a complete setscrew from the gained knowledge.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    146
    Country: United States

    Default

    Very interesting, David. Doug's advise is spot on as usual and is exactly how I would approach it. I would bet a testicle that the threads will be Whitwoth threads. At that size it could be possible to retap to SAE threads to make things easier. The thread pitch is 55į for Whitworth vs 60į for SAE and the crests are more rounded. Of course a lathe will be your best friend for this project. I would assume this set screw had a slotted head.

    I noticed there is a spring at the left side in the lock in one picture. Is it to assist in retracting the bolt?

    My uncle has an old MaNeale Urban safe. I will have to take a look to see if it has something similar. The lock needs service anyway. It is turning a little stiff in old age much like the rest of us. I love the lettered dials. My uncle's is set to L-O-C-K.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Posts
    41
    Country: United States

    Default

    Thank you both.

    At the risk of sacrificing originality, would there be any harm to tapping the hole using the largest width of the existing hole? I don't think it will compromise the integrity of the exterior of the drive wheel or the dial shaft. I believe 1/4 - 28 will work but I need to find my tap that isn't tapered at the bottom (I think that's called a bottom tap).

    I've ordered some brass rod stock which hopefully will arrive in about a week.

    David

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Cleveland, Ohio USA
    Posts
    1,399
    Country: United States

    Default

    As long as you are not intending to use that lock in a safe for actual fire or burglar protection. And why would you use an antique collectable when there are lots of used reasonably priced better suited safes easily found. Holding the parts together for tapping might be a challenge. Use of high strength red locktite to hold together and then heat up the parts to around 500 -550 deg. F for around 5 minutes to release. Or just use the locktite to hold them together.

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