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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devon UK
    Posts
    3,054
    Country: UK

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    Quote Originally Posted by Warren63 View Post
    I’ve noticed that sometimes when paint has been stripped from a plaque it leaves the plaque stained/dyed from the particular colour. This seems to be virtually impossible to remove in any other way than the following. I’ve found the best way to remove this is with a cleaning paste such as ‘Astonish pro cleaning paste’ or another called ‘pink stuff’. It’s a paste with tiny particles in that aggressively removes the stain but not quite aggressively as on a polishing wheel. It leaves the plaque with a Matte finish which then can be given a quick polish to the high points or left alone. I only use this method as a last resort and like I say IMHO it doesn’t seem to be quite as aggressive as some of the friction removal methods. Here’s a couple of pics of the last couple of plaques I’ve used it on. I think it’s a great finish and it can be done gradually and doesn’t have to take 100% of the finish off.
    i would always try a 1200 PSi power washer first just incase that did it - it often does once the paint has been chemicalised.
    also oxalic acid is top dog for steel or iron - it turns rust into steel (on the surface) and can stay as a protective coating afterwards.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Carlisle, England.
    Posts
    251
    Country: England

    Default

    I’ve noticed that sometimes when paint has been stripped from a plaque it leaves the plaque stained/dyed from the particular colour. This seems to be virtually impossible to remove in any other way than the following. I’ve found the best way to remove this is with a cleaning paste such as ‘Astonish pro cleaning paste’ or another called ‘pink stuff’. It’s a paste with tiny particles in that aggressively removes the stain but not quite aggressively as on a polishing wheel. It leaves the plaque with a Matte finish which then can be given a quick polish to the high points or left alone. I only use this method as a last resort and like I say IMHO it doesn’t seem to be quite as aggressive as some of the friction removal methods. Here’s a couple of pics of the last couple of plaques I’ve used it on. I think it’s a great finish and it can be done gradually and doesn’t have to take 100% of the finish off.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Carlisle, England.
    Posts
    251
    Country: England

    Default

    [QUOTE=Tom Gordon;31271]i would always try a 1200 PSi power washer first just incase that did it - it often does once the paint has been chemicalised.
    also oxalic acid is top dog for steel or iron - it turns rust into steel (on the surface) and can stay as a protective coating afterwards.[/.

    Not being in the best of health I’ll have to rule out the power washer Tom. But sounds a brilliant idea. I only ever clean a plaque once. So after the paint has been removed I get them up to a level where any staining or cement (quite often) has been removed and then that’s it. I never polish them again because I like the aged brass look. If I buy a one with no paint ant it’s never been cleaned I leave alone, most plaques I buy have more often than not had a clean with brasso many times. So finding something untouched is rare. I can’t say I’ve ever seen any noticeable detail on my plaques that has been removed by cleaning it only once. But saying that I’m not denying that it doesn’t happen, it’s obvious that it does! I’ll have to take a photo of the before and after to see to what extent it does. Whereabouts would a man buy some of the Oxcalic acid you mentioned Tom ? Or is it not available to the general public?

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devon UK
    Posts
    3,054
    Country: UK

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    [QUOTE=Warren63;31273][QUOTE=Whereabouts would a man buy some of the Oxcalic acid you mentioned Tom ? Or is it not available to the general public?[/QUOTE]
    Any good pharmacy

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