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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    142
    Country: Germany

    Default Chatwood's in The Bank on Colledge Green (Dublin)

    I was last week in Dublin and went for dinner to this restaurant and then to the toilet.

    Serial numbers of the free standing safes are 21780, 21781, 21782. One of the doors has a s/n of 2065 and the other something similar. It looks to me like the doors are just for decoration there. The interior decoration is from about 1895 - 1900 done for the The Belfast Bank.

    What locks did Chatwood use?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails The_Bank-1.jpg   The_Bank-2.jpg   The_Bank-3.jpg   The_Bank-4.jpg   The_Bank-5.jpg  

    The_Bank-6.jpg   The_Bank-7.jpg   The_Bank-8.jpg  

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    1,557
    Country: Wales

    Default

    Nice find! Great to see old safes and SRD's in their original livery like that. Locks-wise I think Chatwood used all their own stuff like their single bitted and double bitted Impregnable but safeman or Tom would know for sure.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    leeds
    Posts
    344
    Country: Great Britain

    Default

    Probably something similar to these on the safes and doors, the grille gate lock looks like it could have been an interesting one.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails chatwood invincible (2).jpg  

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    leeds
    Posts
    344
    Country: Great Britain

    Default

    or double bitted invincibles
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails chatwood invincible grille gate (8).jpg  

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    142
    Country: Germany

    Default

    All key holes were for single bitted keys. So your single bitted example lock might be what these safes were installed with. Thanks.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    leeds
    Posts
    344
    Country: Great Britain

    Default

    they did do a smaller bodied version of that single bitted lock as well but it had the same levers / invincible stump but with the bolt head below the levers blocking the boltwork.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devon UK
    Posts
    3,054
    Country: UK

    Default

    The only safe locks that they bought in were earlier with the keyhole being horizontal normally, so these were likely to be Chatwood locks as Gary described although often in a vault with two keyholes, one would be double bitted keys and the other single bitted. They would make whatever the customer asked for though.
    these are 1895

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    142
    Country: Germany

    Default

    Then they must be from the time when The Belfast Bank opened its business in this building at the end of the 1890s.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    142
    Country: Germany

    Default

    When I saw the other day a Chatwood Invincible on ebay I couln't resist. It looks exactly like Gary's. 8 levers. Serial I38558 (or 138558, but the first letter looks more like an I). The front cover has iron discs where the key hole is and at two additional locations. Perhaps to cover holes in the brass plate?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devon UK
    Posts
    3,054
    Country: UK

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Cepasaccus View Post
    The front cover has iron discs where the key hole is and at two additional locations. Perhaps to cover holes in the brass plate?
    This is a high quality lock off a high quality safe/vault. They donít have holes which need covering.
    Every single aspect of the lock has a purpose, if only one can work out why. This one is easy though. They are hardened disks which would rotate to frustrate anyone trying to drill though them and are at critical places where a hole could allow the lock to be opened without the key.

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