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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
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    131
    Country: Germany

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    The steel discs are indeed in front of valuable parts of the lock, but as you can see on the back of the cover, there are two holes under these discs. The right hole is probably there to hold the pin where the levers are turning on. The other hole is probably where the stump comes into contact with the lever pack, but I can't see the purpose.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    PS: Was the breaking of the spring on the back of the bolt a practical problem?

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    131
    Country: Germany

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    And btw. the back side is decrated with light scratches which are certainly handmade as they are very irregular.

    Click image for larger version. 

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  3. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devon UK
    Posts
    3,047
    Country: UK

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cepasaccus View Post
    And btw. the back side is decrated with light scratches which are certainly handmade as they are very irregular.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    That type of scratching is a common Chatwood feature.
    the other hole in the case looks irregular and may be due to a drill attack.
    If you look at these piccies you will see that the lever pivot, keyhole and bolt stump were all protected and this lock didnít use the cap to support any steel pin
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails F522B68D-C4C3-4D82-8E5D-6B01E8A22EBF.jpeg   CCE10BFB-9247-41BD-AE50-0D8F67CE7BC7.jpeg  

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
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    131
    Country: Germany

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Gordon View Post
    That type of scratching is a common Chatwood feature.
    the other hole in the case looks irregular and may be due to a drill attack.
    The steel discs look all the same, well made and a bit of rust. So if it had been drilled it must have been at a time when they still knew how to cover up the hole really well and also had the will to do so.

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Gordon View Post
    If you look at these piccies you will see that the lever pivot, keyhole and bolt stump were all protected and this lock didnít use the cap to support any steel pin
    I think it does. I looks to me like there is a hole in the cover where the pivot pin is.

    Does someone know when this lock was made? From what I have found here I would say: The number is indeed 1.... and not I.... . Exact dating is not possible. Estimation would be around 1910.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    1,530
    Country: Wales

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Gordon View Post
    If you look at these piccies you will see that the lever pivot, keyhole and bolt stump were all protected and this lock didnít use the cap to support any steel pin
    Tom, it's a good job you're around to confirm unusual detail differences like this as it's a long time since I worked on one and my instinct naturally assumed the (Lever) pivot pin would project slightly above the top of the leverpack, to locate snugly in the (seemingly) matching hole in the cap (under the hard disk protecting it).

    So many other safe locks did this for rigidity/strength to help prevent the pivot pin from bending/breaking under force attack applied from the bolthead.
    Perhaps the shroud casting is such a tight fit around everything they were confident it couldn't allow the leverpack to move even if it was to bend under such attack? Ok I know what's probably coming in answer to that, "everything is so snug a fit the pin can't even bend" Chatwood's legendary quality again no doubt.

    The hole under the intact hard disk near the stump on Cepasaccus' lock does seem a bit of a mystery.
    Huw

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    131
    Country: Germany

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    Photo of the lever pivot:

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Photo of the discs from the front:

    Click image for larger version. 

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  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    131
    Country: Germany

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cepasaccus View Post
    Does someone know when this lock was made? From what I have found here I would say: The number is indeed 1.... and not I.... . Exact dating is not possible. Estimation
    would be around 1910.
    Remembered my serial number wrongly. So from these two dates here https://www.antique-locks.com/showth...2616#post22616 I would say around 1905.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    131
    Country: Germany

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    How would the key for this lock have looked?

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    131
    Country: Germany

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    I have read in the Chatwood catalog here about this double-bitted lock and its uncopyable key. How does that lock work?

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