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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Posts
    60
    Country: France

    Default milners curiosity or not ?

    hi, found this original advertisement on the internal door panel. don't know if this is something rare. from exhibition model ? shop model or some customer models have been sold as well ? i am very exiting with it !
    need to remove the lock because the key is lost and found another something strange : pieces of wood whose function i do not understand

    thanks for details
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails interieur porte.jpg   bois milners.jpg  

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Posts
    636
    Country: Bulgaria

    Default

    The wood might be there to fill in the space. This would reduce the amount of blasting powder which could be trickled into the lock case and thereby improve security.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Posts
    60
    Country: France

    Default

    I didnít have think about that
    Merci beaucoup chubby

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Aberdeenshire
    Posts
    402
    Country: Great Britain

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Chubby View Post
    The wood might be there to fill in the space. This would reduce the amount of blasting powder which could be trickled into the lock case and thereby improve security.
    You're 'bang on' there Chubby.
    Didn't make any difference though when High Explosives came into use.
    Last edited by Huw Eastwood; 08-11-18 at 11:29 AM.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Posts
    636
    Country: Bulgaria

    Default

    HE is scary stuff. The sheer power of it is awesome. That's why I always site AEDS as far from the lock as I can get them.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    1,421
    Country: Wales

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Chubby View Post
    HE is scary stuff. The sheer power of it is awesome. That's why I always site AEDS as far from the lock as I can get them.
    Chubby, what you say about siting retro-fitted AEDs might make sense in theory but unless the entire safe is designed and constructed to match such attack, the remains of your AEDs will be scattered as far around the car park as the rest of the bits of the safe. No matter where in the door you position them. The same goes for bankers/treasury grade safes when enough HE is used. It's scary stuff indeed.
    Huw

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Aberdeenshire
    Posts
    402
    Country: Great Britain

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Huw Eastwood View Post
    Chubby, what you say about siting retro-fitted AEDs might make sense in theory but unless the entire safe is designed and constructed to match such attack, the remains of your AEDs will be scattered as far around the car park as the rest of the bits of the safe. No matter where in the door you position them. The same goes for bankers/treasury grade safes when enough HE is used. It's scary stuff indeed.

    I see what Chubby's getting at Huw. The placing of charges such as Gelignite can only be accomplished through the keyway, punched out CK lock spindle hole, or in a gap created between the door and the body. This would be unlikely to exceed an ounce in the first two instances and a little more in an edge blowing. If the resultant detonation did not create an alarm, a second much heavier charge could of course be applied to the space vacated by the lock using a prophylactic.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Explosive condom.jpg 
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ID:	20411 As you will remember Huw from the photograph of the Double Door Hobbs Hart on my website, if the charge is great enough and the site isolated enough, something has to give but I've never yet seen that apply to a more modern top grade safe. Yet.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devon UK
    Posts
    3,017
    Country: UK

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by safeman View Post
    I see what Chubby's getting at Huw. The placing of charges such as Gelignite can only be accomplished through the keyway, punched out CK lock spindle hole, or in a gap created between the door and the body. This would be unlikely to exceed an ounce in the first two instances and a little more in an edge blowing. If the resultant detonation did not create an alarm, a second much heavier charge could of course be applied to the space vacated by the lock using a prophylactic.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Explosive condom.jpg 
Views:	13 
Size:	49.8 KB 
ID:	20411 As you will remember Huw from the photograph of the Double Door Hobbs Hart on my website, if the charge is great enough and the site isolated enough, something has to give but I've never yet seen that apply to a more modern top grade safe. Yet.
    Or maybe the wood isnít original and someone innocently thought that they were upgrading its fire resistance??

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Aberdeenshire
    Posts
    402
    Country: Great Britain

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Gordon View Post
    Or maybe the wood isnít original and someone innocently thought that they were upgrading its fire resistance??
    Very original Tom but ineffective against high explosives.

    Click image for larger version. 

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ID:	20412 Click image for larger version. 

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ID:	20413

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    North West England.
    Posts
    29
    Country: England

    Default

    I remember hearing a story, about wood in Milner door pans, many years ago. Apparently, one method of opening some of their earlier safes, was to locate the six lock fixing bolts, where they come through to the outer surface of the door, and to knock them out with a hammer and punch, so the lock falls to the bottom of the door pan. Sounds like a long and noisy process, but possible. Maybe a drill would have been better, assuming they weren't hardened. The closely fitting wood keeps the lock roughly in place, so the door bolts can't be withdrawn. Some angle iron around the lock, fixed to the door pan, would have achieved the same result, so I don't know if the story is true.

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