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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Posts
    8
    Country: UK

    Default

    [QUOTE=safeman;29926]
    Quote Originally Posted by Marmite47 View Post


    As an afterthought, there must be a reason that the drawer key is broken. It could have been the wrong key for that lock and forced to breaking point, or it just could be that the drawer is jammed through overloading and that not being fully closed, the key was broken when trying to lock the drawer. The broken handle could be a clue.

    Either way, you may have to force entry. I don't particularly wish to give detailed instructions on how to follow that path until you have a result in recovering the broken section of the key.

    It has never ceased to surprise me how often there are pieces of interest at the back of overloaded drawer compartments.

    Thanks again, the safe is now at my brothers so the next time I am there I'll try the couple of suggestions re broken key and let you know!

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Aberdeenshire
    Posts
    401
    Country: Great Britain

    Default

    [QUOTE=Marmite47;29928]
    Quote Originally Posted by safeman View Post


    Thanks again, the safe is now at my brothers so the next time I am there I'll try the couple of suggestions re broken key and let you know!

    I should have remembered this before. It would be a good idea to check if the lock on the left drawer to see if the bolt is actually engaged. A thin plastic card slid along the top of the drawer should detect whether the bolt is up or not. Probably very difficult but if the broken remains of the knob can be unscrewed and replaced with the other one, it might help to release the drawer if it's only jammed. On the other hand, scuffed paintwork above the drawer towards the centre might suggest previous unsuccessful attempts to prize it out.

    As the safe is elsewhere and to save time I will suggest how you may go about releasing it assuming the lock bolt to be thrown.

    The shelf above the drawer unit requires to be forced up to allow the bolt of the lock to clear.
    The central partition is attached under the shelf by a series of tenon joints which require considerable force to break. Drive a screwdriver between the top of the drawer and the rebate bar on the shelf to create sufficient space for a small chisel. This can then be exploited by a thicker chisel to enlarge the gap, preferably in line with the partition. It may be necessary to apply a small wrecking bar at the partition to displace the shelf sufficiently to allow clearance for the lock before prying the drawer forwards.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Aberdeenshire
    Posts
    401
    Country: Great Britain

    Default Postsript.

    [QUOTE=safeman;29933][QUOTE=Marmite47;29928]


    You could of course try cutting off the head of the bolt with a padsaw
    but the lock could be awkward to repair subsequently.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Posts
    8
    Country: UK

    Default

    [QUOTE=safeman;29933]
    Quote Originally Posted by Marmite47 View Post


    I should have remembered this before. It would be a good idea to check if the lock on the left drawer to see if the bolt is actually engaged. A thin plastic card slid along the top of the drawer should detect whether the bolt is up or not. Probably very difficult but if the broken remains of the knob can be unscrewed and replaced with the other one, it might help to release the drawer if it's only jammed. On the other hand, scuffed paintwork above the drawer towards the centre might suggest previous unsuccessful attempts to prize it out.

    As the safe is elsewhere and to save time I will suggest how you may go about releasing it assuming the lock bolt to be thrown.

    The shelf above the drawer unit requires to be forced up to allow the bolt of the lock to clear.
    The central partition is attached under the shelf by a series of tenon joints which require considerable force to break. Drive a screwdriver between the top of the drawer and the rebate bar on the shelf to create sufficient space for a small chisel. This can then be exploited by a thicker chisel to enlarge the gap, preferably in line with the partition. It may be necessary to apply a small wrecking bar at the partition to displace the shelf sufficiently to allow clearance for the lock before prying the drawer forwards.
    I was just about to send update when your reply came through!

    Anyway managed to get drawer out yesterday afternoon, magnet was used to get partial/ remains of key out, sadly it only came part of the way so pliers, some strength and a few choice words were used and the drawer came out - luckily the bolt wasn't in the locked position, but I guess like you suggest the previous owner broke the knob and key trying to get the drawer open - it was just 'wedged' shut with old age.

    My brother got the whole lock out using your previous advice and has opened it to get the remainder of the broken key. He also got the remnants of the knob. So my most likely last 2 questions are: can I get a replacement knob preferably genuine? And can the internal lock mechanism been 'altered' to match the other drawer lock? I am assuming that in 1899 Milners didn't have many 'combinations' for keys.


    Thanks again :)

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Aberdeenshire
    Posts
    401
    Country: Great Britain

    Default

    [QUOTE=Marmite47;29935]
    Quote Originally Posted by safeman View Post

    I was just about to send update when your reply came through

    Thanks again :)

    Excellent news! I would doubt if you can obtain a replacement knob handle. You may have to resort to making a wooden copy. You never know - Ebay may just come up with something.

    A locksmith should be able to shuffle the levers to match the other lock and key.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Aberdeenshire
    Posts
    401
    Country: Great Britain

    Default

    [QUOTE=safeman;29936]
    Quote Originally Posted by Marmite47 View Post


    Excellent news! I would doubt if you can obtain a replacement knob handle. You may have to resort to making a wooden copy. You never know - Ebay may just come up with something.

    A locksmith should be able to shuffle the levers to match the other lock and key.

    For example :
    eBay item number:
    302273060175

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    99
    Country: Germany

    Default

    To make it for all easier accessible:

    eBay Link removed- realise your good intentions as the link posted was clearly to help the OP here, but eBay links only last a maximum 90 days, after which they become a distracting frustration to anyone clicking on them, not to mention an additional waste and drain on Brian's site bandwidth! This is why members are discouraged from posting ANY external links as they rarely remain intact indefinitely.
    Last edited by Huw Eastwood; 18-10-18 at 07:54 PM. Reason: eBay Link removed

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Posts
    8
    Country: UK

    Default

    Thanks to Safeman for all your help.

    And thanks for the above link
    Last edited by Huw Eastwood; 17-10-18 at 11:32 PM. Reason: Quoted Link removed

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