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Thread: chubb safe no32

  1. #21
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    About 1932

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by safeman View Post
    Sadly Tom this safe only passed through my hands at John Tann (Scotland) in the 1970's. At the time I had no interest from an archaeological point of view in the safe and it was sold on.
    Safeman I bet you had fun moving that one when you sold it, think my old drop forged Dorvic roller bar (was good for bankers/treasury wrestling on rollers) would bend just seeing one of those CBs...there's heavy, and there's HEAVY!
    Huw

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Huw Eastwood View Post
    Safeman I bet you had fun moving that one when you sold it, think my old drop forged Dorvic roller bar (was good for bankers/treasury wrestling on rollers) would bend just seeing one of those CBs...there's heavy, and there's HEAVY!
    Huw, like your new portrait - not so stern.

    These safes along with similar weight Chubb Specials came in and went out on Glasgow Hiring Co. low loaders on to concrete floors so no great problems but using 10 ton toe-jacks in place of the usual pinch bars.
    Some time ago I seem to remember you wrote of moving extremely heavy safes with just pinch bars, a heel (fulcrum) and solid rollers. As some onlookers used to observe when these heavies were being moved "that's how they built the pyramids". More bodies of course then.
    I have an old photo (1957) showing how it was before Hiab and Tail Lifts just getting a safe on to a lorry. The winch-man is barely visible.

    Click image for larger version. 

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ID:	20202To paraphrase Archimedes - "give me a fulcrum for my lever and I will move the world".

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by safeman View Post
    Huw, like your new portrait - not so stern.

    These safes along with similar weight Chubb Specials came in and went out on Glasgow Hiring Co. low loaders on to concrete floors so no great problems but using 10 ton toe-jacks in place of the usual pinch bars.
    Some time ago I seem to remember you wrote of moving extremely heavy safes with just pinch bars, a heel (fulcrum) and solid rollers. As some onlookers used to observe when these heavies were being moved "that's how they built the pyramids". More bodies of course then.
    I have an old photo (1957) showing how it was before Hiab and Tail Lifts just getting a safe on to a lorry. The winch-man is barely visible.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Loading Kent Rd '57.jpg 
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Size:	101.5 KB 
ID:	20201 Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Fulcrum.JPG 
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ID:	20202To paraphrase Archimedes - "give me a fulcrum for my lever and I will move the world".
    It looks like they started winching it up 3 bits of 8X2 before the middle piece broke! I wouldn’t like to take that safe up on just 2 pieces....

  5. #25
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    It looks like they picked the wagon with the highest bed possible 8-) . I still move some of mine like that, although with a steel ramp with roller bearings welded on the sides.

  6. #26
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    Give me a lever long enough, and something to rest it on and I shall bend the lever!

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Stephenson View Post
    I still move some of mine like that, although with a steel ramp with roller bearings welded on the sides.
    Snap, I'm glad you said that Gary as that was our only way of ever doing it!

    Quote Originally Posted by Chubby View Post
    Give me a lever long enough, and something to rest it on and I shall bend the lever!
    Chubby,put your feet up and take things easy- if the lever is that long it will already be bending under its own weight. Sorted!
    Huw

  8. #28
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    [QUOTE=Huw Eastwood;29820]Snap, I'm glad you said that Gary as that was our only way of ever doing it!

    Scoff as you may at our two battens (apparently they’re known as deals in the South) but at least there was never any danger of the safe slipping far back down on the wood if the winch ratchet or wire rope were to malfunction. Steel on steel sounds pretty dodgy to me on the slope.

    Tom, there was never a third batten. The small section between the battens was to stop the safe from grounding on the road as it was tipped off the pallet on to the battens.

    Anybody, as a matter of interest, how, to your knowledge were safes handled up flight of stairs, straight or curled, cantilevered or otherwise, before the current prohibitive legislation?

  9. #29
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    There was no scoffing from me safeman, what I meant was I was relieved that Gary admitted he still uses that old school method as that was our way of doing it as well, for about another 50 years after your photo...
    Huw

  10. #30
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    If before stairclimbers, lighter ones physically manhandled strapped to a sackcart, heavier ones winched up on boards or cribbed up.

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