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Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    84
    Country: Germany

    Default Ratner 9-lever lock - powder proof!

    I got another (probably) Ratner lock. It looks powder proof, has 9 levers and a mechanism to block the bolt unless the levers have been lifted. I assume it is a pretty standard Ratner safe lock, although the modern (probably) replacement keys are quite long (and not well cut). The serial is 69296. (Nothing else imprinted in the lock.) From the other serials I have seen from Ratner I would date it to the beginning of the 1960s, but a powder proof lock made in the 1960s seems to me indeed quite unlikely. So I have quite some information about this lock, but most is just likely and unlikely. I would be grateful for some clarification.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Ratner-1.jpg   Ratner-2.jpg   Ratner-3.jpg  

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    leeds
    Posts
    263
    Country: Great Britain

    Default

    Normally see those with the single way keyway and thick gauge to suit stems and bits on bank strongroom doors.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    leeds
    Posts
    263
    Country: Great Britain

    Default

    one of these is 68142
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails ratner 68142 sr door old (1).JPG   ratner 68142 sr door old (3).JPG   ratner london sr (6).JPG  

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    84
    Country: Germany

    Default

    Thanks. So maybe the 1960s are possible and 5" long keys might have really been necessary.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Aberdeenshire
    Posts
    338
    Country: Great Britain

    Default Ratner Locks.

    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Stephenson View Post
    one of these is 68142
    Going back a bit, one possible reason for the use of brass or phosphor bronze rather than cast iron block casting which was originally to prevent the tamping of excessive amounts of gunpowder into the lock as was the use of the collar and in-out keyway - could have been that in later years when gelignite was used cast iron fragmented allowing the levers and bolt to disintegrate whereas the non-ferrous material was more malleable and tenacious.

    Incidentally, this was a direct copy of Milner's Patent Gunpowder Proof lock (1854) and used by Ratners which was founded by D R Ratcliffe, Wm Milner's son in law in 1890. It was never known as a powder-proof lock. 69296 dates from 1963, 68254 from 1961, and 74184 from 1969, the year before Ratners ceased production as such. Long stems probably Ranalloy doors. Key retaining single keyway customer option plus less space for gelignite.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    84
    Country: Germany

    Default

    Thanks. The descent of the Milner's lock is obvious. But I wonder why there is a gap in the lever between the turning point the key side/belly. With this there is more space for stuffing something. Milner's levers don't have this.

    The corrosion resistant lock (which normally not built as being corrosion resistent) I mentioned in the other thread is normally full bronze case (when corrosion resistant). My specimen (which was made for a safe which has corrosion resistant locks and has on all parts the correct numbers) has bronze body and steel cover. Who knows why.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    1,369
    Country: Wales

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Cepasaccus View Post
    Thanks. The descent of the Milner's lock is obvious. But I wonder why there is a gap in the lever between the turning point the key side/belly. With this there is more space for stuffing something. Milner's levers don't have this
    Cepasaccus, if its the shape in the Levers that I think you're referring to, then I think you'll find Milners did have it, but their powderproof cases were cast with a blocking projection to match.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    https://www.antique-locks.com/showth...-gauge+Milners

    I only have these two Milners left now, but from memory the hundreds of locks I saw out in the field were all like this.
    Huw

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    84
    Country: Germany

    Default

    You are right! It seems because the space is filled there I didn't remembert it.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
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    leeds
    Posts
    263
    Country: Great Britain

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Huw Eastwood View Post
    Cepasaccus, if its the shape in the Levers that I think you're referring to, then I think you'll find Milners did have it, but their powderproof cases were cast with a blocking projection to match.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	image.jpeg 
Views:	13 
Size:	208.0 KB 
ID:	20013

    https://www.antique-locks.com/showth...-gauge+Milners

    I only have these two Milners left now, but from memory the hundreds of locks I saw out in the field were all like this.
    Unusual to see the pipe key version of that lock, nice.

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