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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Posts
    627
    Country: Bulgaria

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    Is there a number on the top edge of the door of the Chubb? If so, what is it? that would tell you the exact weight.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    leeds
    Posts
    296
    Country: Great Britain

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    "The Cash Ratings will be approximately £4000 for the Sterling, £8000 for the Executive and £10000 for the Trustee but my personal belief is that these Ratner figures are unrealistically high."

    interesting, If it was my money going in it between the Ratner and something modern with 10k cover like a Chubb Duoguard, I would pick the Ratner every time.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Posts
    627
    Country: Bulgaria

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    Amen to that.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    1,402
    Country: Wales

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    Safeman's surprised me with those figures, I'd have thought the Sterling would be ok for £7-8k, perhaps even £10k at a push, and more like £15k on the Ratner. Realise ratings are always subjective and it varies between insurers, but they seem a bit low.

    If I had 15 grand in cash laying around I'd happily keep it in either of those two before any modern euro grade 1 or 2 box!
    Huw

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Posts
    6
    Country: England

    Default

    Wow, thank you everyone for your help.

    Gary: Thanks for giving me the heads up! That cabinet is huge... I think that will be the most difficult one to remove and now i know that it may have asbestos makes it even more difficult.

    Huw:

    The sizes (in cm) of the following safe
    Pic 1: chatwood milner - 63d x 73w x 185h
    pic 2: Chubbs -
    60d x 70w x 80h (close up of the photo shows the number etched in the middle bolt is H1611 THANKS SAFEMAN!)
    pic 3: chubbs -
    60d x 60w x 130h
    pic 4: remington rand -
    100d x 130w x 165h
    pic 5: stratford sterling -
    70d x 70w x 110h
    pic6: chubbs -
    65d x 65w x 175h
    pic 7: ratner -
    70d x 70w x 150h

    Chubby - there is no number on the top of the door for the chubbs in pic 3. I checked everwhere, but safeman has pointed out the number is on the middle bolt (H1611)

    Gary - funny you should say that... theres a note in the Ratner which explained that this was used for cash!

    So should i check the end of the chubbs bolts to find more markings to identify the model?

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Posts
    6
    Country: England

    Default

    Oh by the way, forgot to mention some of these safes are actually in a strongroom! Any ideas how these are dismantled/ removed?!? Or is it a case of not bothering

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devon UK
    Posts
    3,015
    Country: UK

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by stevenkuk View Post
    Oh by the way, forgot to mention some of these safes are actually in a strongroom! Any ideas how these are dismantled/ removed?!? Or is it a case of not bothering
    I think you now realise the problems.
    Not one, but three that are 1.5 tonnes each, designed and effective at resisting attack but without modern insurance rating certificates, and on the second floor, along with a load of asbestos safes.
    if they were on the ground floor in a loading bay, they would cost you a lot of money to have removed.
    i would recommend that now you know the weights, your builders should be consulted and see what they say.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    84
    Country: Australia

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    The other contributors to this thread dwarf the knowledge that I have, but I suggest you post images of the strongroom for them.

    There are "portable" strongrooms made of modular parts that can be dismantled and moved, however many(most?) strongrooms will be part of the building & not worth removing.

    I have seen people sell a strongroom door & frame before, but the costs of removing and transporting them will usually outweigh their value.

    If you leave the strong room intact but do not intend to use it as a strongroom, then consider having the door disabled and made safe (to prevent accidental lock ins) by a suitably qualified safe technician. This should not be a destructive process & as long as you retain any parts that are removed, the door could be returned to service at a later date if required.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devon UK
    Posts
    3,015
    Country: UK

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    The most usual way of removing a strong room within a building is to crane a 35 tonne demolition machine onto the top of it and work downwards, throwing the rubble down a lift shaft.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Aberdeenshire
    Posts
    375
    Country: Great Britain

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Huw Eastwood View Post
    Safeman's surprised me with those figures, I'd have thought the Sterling would be ok for £7-8k, perhaps even £10k at a push, and more like £15k on the Ratner. Realise ratings are always subjective and it varies between insurers, but they seem a bit low.

    If I had 15 grand in cash laying around I'd happily keep it in either of those two before any modern euro grade 1 or 2 box!
    Hello Huw,

    As regards the Ratner, I think I was mistaken in thinking it was one of the post 1970 Ratners made by Tann whereas from the handle it appears more like a T4 which had a rating at the time of only £6000 for reasons which I cannot go into on this site.

    Why was a Sterling IV safe made in 1974 given cash rating of £2000 yet today seems to be good for £10,000?

    The main problem with safe ratings is that decisions by insurers were usually based on in-house makers tests (demonstrations). You say that you believe the ratings to be too low but the reason the British safe industry has been descimated is that the unsubstantiated commercially driven high ratings caused long established companies like Tann to go out of business after almost 200 years.

    When the LPC came to establish the British safe testing authority in 1990 at Borehamwood I was invited to work with the test team in setting up the training techniques which reinforced my belief that despite the misgivings, made me realise that this was the most reliable means of grading a safe as it included all the equipment and methods that could be brought to bear in reality (apart from the fatigue factor).

    There are ongoing discussions regarding the standards of some European test houses.

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