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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    117
    Country: United States

    Default

    I don't mind getting a little off topic. The lock/safe forums have been pretty slow so any chatter is good chatter. (pun intended)

    The modern tooling is getting more and more versatile. While the tool holder is designed for square tooling it also has a small v in the bottom to support round stock. The boring bar which is made of carbide and has a replaceable carbide bit is extremely rigid. It also has a flat surface on the top to aid in mounting and to keep the cutting angle secure. It is a pricey chunk of metal and I probably wouldn't lay out the cash for it but it came with the lathe/mill combo when I bought it. The previous owner had spent a lot of money on tooling.

    There is something to be said for good old HSS tooling. I just was gifted a large selection of HSS tooling from my uncle. When he bought his lathe many moons ago from a 40 year Westinghouse tool and die maker, he got tool boxes full of HHS (small amount of carbide) stock and specially ground bits. At 89, he is passing some on to me. I will cherish them.

    I do need to improve my sharpening techniques and equipment though.

    Huw, I wish you were a neighbor. I could learn a lot hanging around you. Now, if I could only solve a glitch in the CNC program...

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    1,321
    Country: Wales

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    CNC? We don't use the 'C' word in my shed :-O

    When you said the digital readout was invaluable I wrongly assumed you had a manual lathe fitted with a 2 or 3-axis DRO, didn't realise you do it auto'd on the c word.
    Definitely way to go for repetitive batch work and perhaps as few as say 10 or 12, but for one-off parts or a couple of different washers surely you could turn them manually by hand in a fraction of the time the programming alone would take?
    Huw

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    117
    Country: United States

    Default

    C word, now that's funny.

    You assumed correctly, I have been making parts manually. The DRO really shines for that. This machine was DRO and CNC equipped when I bought it. I loaded the program up on a computer and fought a few gremlins but had it operational for the mill. Before I could set up the lathe a health issue sidelined me for a period of time. That's all it took to forget most of what I had learned, so when I needed to make a part I just did it manually. Like you said, it's faster.

    CNC does not make a machinist, only a machine operator. That is why the area technical collage still trains the machine tool students on manual machines for a semester. Those days are probably numbered as technology advances. I'm back at fooling around with it but am having some issues. I just might be getting to old as I sometimes deplore tech. That damn Iphone, scanning codes on the kids car, I even got tired of to much tech in the new Corvette. It is now gone and I'm going back to a 60's - 70's muscle car.

    In old age I think I will concentrate on Model T's, old safes, and drinking beer. In which order is still to be determined.
    Last edited by 00247; 20-12-17 at 07:58 PM.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    leeds
    Posts
    207
    Country: Great Britain

    Default

    Stunning work, if your beer drinking is of the same quality as your old safes, then respect is due.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    1,321
    Country: Wales

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Stephenson View Post
    Stunning work, if your beer drinking is of the same quality as your old safes, then respect is due.
    +1, I'm still a little way off old age, but reverse the order to beer, then old safes and Model Ts and I'm in anyway.

    It's interesting you mentioned about CNC makes an operator and not a machinist. I couldn't agree more, from discussions on engineering forums over here it's already showing problems this side of the pond, at least your tech colleges are still training on manual machines.
    Apparently it's getting common for youngsters working in CNC over here to scratch their heads when something goes pear shaped in the CNC machine, everything on shut down as they haven't a clue what's happening between the machine, the tools, or the interaction with the metal/workpiece etc.

    It's like any hands-on skill the operator needs a feel for what's going on. Manual turning, milling, cutting threads etc, in some ways are little different to hand making a detector lock key, picking open a good cylinder lock or drilling open a bankers safe.

    Unless the subject can experience each of the different processes and what they can throw at you, and at all of the different stages of doing them, and, (crucially) develop that instinctive 'feel' for what's happening at every stage, including when things aren't right, then there's little point as they won't end up much good at doing any of them.
    With more and more tech and electronics coming in and new systems like 3-D printing rapidly gaining ground it has to make one think where it's all heading.

    Anyway, hope you get back on your feet and good luck with those c word gremlins :-)
    Huw

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    117
    Country: United States

    Default

    The National safe project has been on the back burner for the most part. I finally got some of the simpler artwork along with the lettering so I will start some gold leaf in a few days. I also have been experimenting with the artwork on the plated pieces. With sample pieces plated in copper and nickel, a number of trial and error processes were tried.

    The inner door cover and the inner compartment door are copper plated, darkened, and have polished swirls. Copper is relatively easy to work with but it still took a number of tries to get the results I was satisfied with. This is the result I plan to go with.

    15692x5 1

    The nickel plated front cover was more difficult. Nickel is naturally more resistant to chemicals (especially when polished) so finding the correct chemicals to use is critical. It was hard to find information online and no one seemed to know what would work. Finally, I hit pay dirt when I called Jax Chemical Company in Mount Vernon, New York. There, a knowledgeable representative spent a good amount of time with me discussing what chemicals may give the results I needed. He also shared possible procedures that he knew other customers used for restorations.

    It took a number of tries but I came up with a process that gives repeatable results. I also had to try several types of mask to create a design. This is the result I plan to use. It is just a hand cut pattern that is similar to the original to prove the process. I was pleased how well the edge of the mask held up and how sharp the edges of the lines are. In fact, they show every flaw of my hand cutting with an Exacto knife. With a computer cut mask it should duplicate the original design as close as possible.

    1zqr7lh 1

    264jc7q 1

    The original. I will go into more details once the pieces are done successfully.

    zn78du 1

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