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Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devon UK
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    3,047
    Country: UK

    Default Dodgiest repro plaque that I have ever seen

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/VINTAGE-1920...oAAOSwXetZXc~z

    "No idea of the provenance of this piece, entirely possible its a reproduction."
    You don't say!
    Last edited by Tom Gordon; 12-07-17 at 04:56 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    1,528
    Country: Wales

    Default

    Bit of a shocker what they bid for it...but at least it had Sydney spelt right.
    Here's a screenshot in all its glory for future reference
    Click image for larger version. 

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  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Carlisle, England.
    Posts
    232
    Country: England

    Default

    So do you guys think this is a copy of an original? The rosette in the centre was probably an escutcheon on the genuine then. I'm always a bit suspect when there are no pictures of the reverse of the plaque because sometimes it can be the only pointer to its originality. I've probably gained most of my knowledge off you guys and trawling through pictures of originals. The more I see of these copies the more it makes me question myself when buying. There's nothing better than finding one with several coats of old paint on and a crusty/rusty reverse.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
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    Devon UK
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    Country: UK

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Warren63 View Post
    So do you guys think this is a copy of an original? The rosette in the centre was probably an escutcheon on the genuine then. I'm always a bit suspect when there are no pictures of the reverse of the plaque because sometimes it can be the only pointer to its originality. I've probably gained most of my knowledge off you guys and trawling through pictures of originals. The more I see of these copies the more it makes me question myself when buying. There's nothing better than finding one with several coats of old paint on and a crusty/rusty reverse.
    I have no hesitation in saying that it is repro.
    the holes for the fixing screws don't even seem to go all the way through the plaque.
    The quality of casting is atrocious.
    The escutcheon appears not to move.....

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Carlisle, England.
    Posts
    232
    Country: England

    Default

    I didn't doubt your opinions for a minute about it being a copy. What I meant was is it a cobbled together Indian one, or do you know of the original (if there is one) that it's been directly cast off....

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
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    Country: Wales

    Default

    Apparently he was involved in safe manufacture warren, originally they were ironmongers that branched out into safes, engineering and foundry work- even locomotive and carriage parts !

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devon UK
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Huw Eastwood View Post
    Apparently he was involved in safe manufacture warren, originally they were ironmongers that branched out into safes, engineering and foundry work- even locomotive and carriage parts !
    That was not uncommon.
    i have come across clay pipe moulds and paper presses made by safe manufacturers.
    Chatwood made train carriage handles, water pumps, sewing machines, machine tools....
    specialisation is a modern concept

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
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    Country: Wales

    Default

    Sure thing Tom what machine tools did Chatwood make altogether,as I've heard of their steam hammers but can't remember anything else. I'm guessing it might be multi-spindle drills or gang-mills which theyd likely developed and manufactured originally for their own production like boltwork and boltcases etc?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devon UK
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    Country: UK

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Huw Eastwood View Post
    Sure thing Tom what machine tools did Chatwood make altogether,as I've heard of their steam hammers but can't remember anything else. I'm guessing it might be multi-spindle drills or gang-mills which theyd likely developed and manufactured originally for their own production like boltwork and boltcases etc?
    I don't know but it is a possibility that Reed Chatwood compressors were originally Chatwood

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