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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Cleveland, Ohio USA
    Posts
    1,250
    Country: United States

    Default

    Wylk, your attention to detail continues to surprise me. More than likely those were manganese steel pins installed around the perimeter of the door, although that does seem like excessive overkill on a door of that thickness. But during that period, overkill was the name of the game and to my knowledge there was never a successful door attack on doors of that thickness. The overkill would discourage even making the attempt.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Gilbert, AZ 85298
    Posts
    275
    Country: United States

    Default

    medeco - THANK YOU for posting the interior of the remote combo viewer. These devices are of particular interest to me and I have wondered about their interior for years. The closest I could find was a patent on Cylindrical Vault Doors used at the NY Fed and PA Treasury. See attached file

    I have not seen the vault door in the pictures you posted, where is this vault located? I created an inventory of remote combo viewer vaults, see attached file. Could you please review and let me know if I missed any.

    Can you post pics of other remote combo viewers? Thanks!
    Attached Files Attached Files

  3. #13

    Default

    Hey guys,

    as a "remote combination viewer addict" I want to participate here :D So if the question is

    1. How does a RCV work?

    this is simple to answer: All you need is a way to remotely control the bolt work. This is done via two pins - one for opening and the other for closing the door. The RCV provides the necessary mechanics for this and the rest is details.

    But if the question is rather

    2. How is this done for the various doors?

    then we need blueprints or other photos.
    Unfortunately I understood the inner workings of RCVs only recently so my big model door does not show this. But if I build a new one, it will have a fully functional and original RCV :)

    Best regards

    Maik

    PS: I calculated the weight of my current door: 506,8kg or 1013,6lbs. Yeah, me too :D

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    new york / NYC area
    Posts
    52
    Country: United States

    Default

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	P6080683.JPG 
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ID:	16937

    This is the same type of viewer but the door lug locks of the pressure system locks into the viewer case. There are two dials that can be seen. The big spoke wheel is used to open the locking collar or ring that is affixed to the frame. This door only swings . In the center of this round door is a door that hides a triple or quad time lock. Hope this helps.TJ

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    1,321
    Country: Wales

    Default

    Nice, the matching emergency door to the main rectangular door you posted- what a monster, always love the exaggerated proportions on the emergency doors- the filing cabinet gives a good sense of scale. Also has the same alternated pins/plugs visible around the edge. Thanks for posting these TJ, you will have made the forum fans of these doors very happy!
    Last edited by Huw Eastwood; 10-02-17 at 09:56 PM.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    1,223
    Country: United States

    Default

    Thanks for this latest picture! Emergency doors often are "different but similar" to their big-brother main door. I like the two arrows that line up to show the locking lugs are aligned for closure. There are pins in the door like those in the main door. Both halves of the alarm contact can be seen. No surprise there is a beefy door stop. A data plate of some sort is on the lower hinge that has been painted over, demonstrating that this was not the original paint (if it was even painted at all in the first place). Was the central area was originally glass, replaced with metal at a later time when the glass broke?

    All that dust makes me wonder if the door has even been closed recently. The greasy appearance of the door frame makes me want to grab that can of WD-40 and do some cleaning.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Gilbert, AZ 85298
    Posts
    275
    Country: United States

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    What is the purpose of the manganese steel pins installed around the perimeter of the door?

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Gilbert, AZ 85298
    Posts
    275
    Country: United States

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    The main door appears to have a single combo and the emergency door has a dual combo, is that right?

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Gilbert, AZ 85298
    Posts
    275
    Country: United States

    Default

    I believe the data plate on the lower hinge may be an access panel for servicing the hinge. Similar plates can been seen on the Cleveland Federal Reserve's Emergency Vault Door:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	CFR EDoor.jpg 
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ID:	16942

    and One King West's Main Vault Door:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	1WK Main Door.jpg 
Views:	25 
Size:	67.6 KB 
ID:	16943

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    new york / NYC area
    Posts
    52
    Country: United States

    Default

    The main door has two locks if you look at the viewer you will see in the lower area of the case a second helix gear. That was the second dial hook up. It was removed for repair.

    The pins are a anti- drill system that most vaults use for protection. The idea is hard to soft to hard . This type of construction or lamination of hard to soft metal will break drill bits off in the hole. ( A drill bit edge will wear or dull with the factors of cutting speed to cutting pressure to the materiel hardness. When you change the materiel hardness you change the fiction or drag on the edge of the drill bit. This change will break a drill bit off in seconds.)

    Those little plate are doors to adj the hing system on the crane arm. The wrenches are made custom to fit each door. Hope this explains some of the questions. TJ

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