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  1. #1
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    Default Yale 101-1/2 comb lock

    The pictures posted here, and in following posts, are of the later 3 wheel key change version, where the change key used is actually a Yale paracentric pin tumbler key. I know there are some curious locksmiths as well as collectors out there who would love to open one these locks up. Hopefully the postings will satisfy the curious. Working with the lock can be difficult. Even changing the combination can present problems. These first pictures will show the changeable wheel design and how it is similar to the standard Yale hand change wheel. Like the standard wheel there is an outer and inner wheel section. Unlike the standard wheel, there is not an internal circular brass spring clip installed in the outer wheel section. This means the the outer and inner wheel sections will easily separate and mesh back together allowing for a comb change. Note there are 100 teeth on the wheels, one tooth per number.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails IMG_20161206_081407.jpg   IMG_20161206_081158.jpg  

  2. #2
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    Default

    Here is a side view of the standard and 101-1/2 wheels.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails IMG_20161206_081714.jpg   IMG_20161206_081654.jpg  

  3. #3
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    Default

    Note the 101 has a smaller depth of tooth engagement than the standard wheel. These two pictures show the engaged and disengaged positions of the wheel which occur in changing the comb. Not much movement is required to disengage the two wheel sections.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails IMG_20161206_081933.jpg   IMG_20161206_081914.jpg  

  4. #4
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    Default

    Here is the back side of the wheel. The inner wheel is disengaged when the inner wheel is flush with the thin rim of the outer wheel.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails IMG_20161206_083635.jpg   IMG_20161206_083642.jpg  

  5. #5
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    Default

    Here is an Ely Norris double dial cannonball and it is the only safe where the Yale 101-1/2 lock is used. There are other double dial cannonballs out there, but they use different locks.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails IMG_20161206_101408.jpg  

  6. #6
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    Default

    Here is the lock prior to takedown. As you can see the wheels are well concealed. Offset drive with redundant wheel pack, meaning only one is needed to open the lock. It cannot be set to dual custody.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails IMG_20161206_163858.jpg  

  7. #7
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    Default

    When changing the comb, the outer wheel sections are moved out of engagement from the inner wheel. This is accomplished with a simple turn of the key, but the design of the parts to pull this off is not so simple. A cage surrounding the wheels is center hung similar to the door and crane hinge of the cannonball. This allows for a straight albeit slight in and out movement of the wheel cage as the key is rotated.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails IMG_20161206_153024.jpg   IMG_20161206_153248.jpg   IMG_20161206_153437.jpg  

  8. #8
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    A couple more pics.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails IMG_20161206_153112.jpg   IMG_20161206_155511.jpg  

  9. #9
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    Default

    This wheel cage cap is not just a cover but is an integral part of the changing mechanism. It also deserves mention as being one part you don't want to remove, unless there is a very good reason to do so. Note the very fine but interrupted threading. Beginner locksmiths will remember the care required to install mortise cylinders without cross threading them. Well those 32 tpi mortise cylinders are a piece of cake compared to these almost 2" x interrupted 40 tpi caps.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails IMG_20161207_184843.jpg   IMG_20161207_185029.jpg   IMG_20161207_185019.jpg  

  10. #10
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    Default

    Here are the 3 outer wheels and the spacer blocks that hold the outer wheels in alignment. The spacer blocks lock into the cage so they stay in position. There is a rim at the bottom of the cage and the cap on top holds everything together. Move the cage and the outer wheels go with it.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails IMG_20161207_193037.jpg   IMG_20161207_193727.jpg   IMG_20161207_193907_1.jpg  

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