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  1. #11
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    Oct 2009
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    Adjusting for fly and drive pin wear in Yale hand change locks can be a challenge. This wear can also cause difficulty with a comb change on the 101-1/2. When new, the wheel spline teeth should align properly, allowing the outer wheel to easily re-engage the inner wheel. Difficulty in getting the change key to return to vertical is a good indication the teeth on one or more wheels are misaligned. Before tearing into the lock to see what the problem is, experiment with positioning the wheels slightly off the index mark, starting with the 3 rd number. Identifying this type of problem is virtually impossible with the lock disassembled. Once the key turns back to to vertical, find the centers of the wheel gates through dialing diagnostics and live with the fact one or more numbers of the comb may work best at half numbers.

  2. #12
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    Next up are the keylocks used to change the combinations. It would be unusual to find much wear on these keys and locks, meaning it would be a rare case where the locks would need to be removed. Even loss of the keys is not a big deal for any locksmith worth his salt. Note only the last three pins are used on the extremely common Yale 8 key. What looks like dirt on the end shot of the lock is actually flake graphite used to lubricate the lock.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails IMG_20161209_081908.jpg   IMG_20161209_081930.jpg   IMG_20161209_082009.jpg  

  3. #13
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    A second function performed by the keylock is to move the catch lever into the double notches in the outer wheels. This holds the outer wheels stationary as the inner wheels are repositioned during the comb change.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails IMG_20161209_090330.jpg   IMG_20161209_090351.jpg  

  4. #14
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    I had to look up what the catch lever was called. Brake lever does sound better. The patent was filed in Jan of 1907. Diebold also patented a side change lock for one their cannonball models, meant to compete with the Ely compound door. Don't know if the Diebold ever saw production.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails IMG_20161209_103748.jpg   IMG_20161209_103659.jpg  

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
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    441
    Country: United States

    Default Yale 101-1/2 comb lock

    Hello Doug
    Thank for good information on your lock. Was having problem trying to find patent number for 1066629 on Google. Where did you get this patent number or I'm missing something....Timothy......

  6. #16
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    Oct 2009
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    Most of my patent copies were right out of the patent books. Not sure why it doesn't come up. Try googling B.F. Klohs and it should come up. Unfortunately the lock is not mine but from a restoration job. Since the lock had to come off the safe anyway, I decided to do this pictorial of the lock.

  7. #17
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    Dec 2009
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    I almost never use Google for patent searches unless it's something the US patent office can't do (such as search older patents by inventor name), or I'm not looking for a US patent.

    In this case Google Patents (http://patents.google.com), given 1066629 as the search term, comes up with foreign patent GB1066629A which is for a loading apparatus for a lorry. It does, however, prompt you with other possibilities including US1066629A which is the one in question. Of course the US patent office comes up with the patent of interest given that number.

    Is that the difficulty you were having?

  8. #18
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    Wylk, I was hoping you might have some input regarding patent searches. Here are pictures showing the bolt retraction connecting linkage. Note however the bolt didn't retract even though the linkage moved into the opening position. To the few of you who are actually studying this post, any ideas as to why this occurred? There will be a little something in your stocking if you get it right.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails IMG_20161213_152820.jpg   IMG_20161213_153009.jpg  

  9. #19
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    I think you need the other side to be in place as well, which would provide a "stationary" set of teeth for the pinion to roll against and in doing so, move the bolt? Sort of like a rack and pinion. Otherwise the pinion simply rotates on its axis.

  10. #20
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    Mar 2010
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    Wylk is right. I had to go back and study the pictures but when I saw the one with both linkages in place I first thought how could it move? Ahh, that's why there is the slot on the linkage. The other linkage locks the pivot gear on the bolt to move it and complete the action.

    23j33x2 1 - Yale 101-1/2 comb lock
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails IMG_20161206_163858.jpg  

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