Welcome to our world of Locks and Locksmiths (click logo or scroll down to view all):-
 www.Antique-Locks.com 
  
HoL
   COLTi
Or are you looking for modern, or recent past,
Keys, Locks or Safes.
keys, locks & safes
Industrial Archaeology of Locks HoL Museum
COLTi
  
Please support our forum sponsors where you can.
Researching locks from antiquity to the recent past.Maintaining a reference collection & archive.Today's scene and cutting edge developments.
Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 38
  1. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Posts
    503
    Country: Bulgaria

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Safeone View Post
    Would corrosion of files, drills, taps etc that get thown in the mix cause eventual weakening of the concrete ?
    No more than any other reinforcement.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Posts
    503
    Country: Bulgaria

    Default

    Sort of bumping this one a bit.

    Does anybody have any thoughts about block construction v poured construction?

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Cleveland, Ohio USA
    Posts
    1,250
    Country: United States

    Default

    There was a similar burglary of a money chest here in the states back in the 1870's, where the chest was delaminated in a 2 hour period. I wonder if either burglary could be performed as quickly today using the exact same equipment. Certainly would be interesting to watch, both the now and the then. Being able to make something that is a great improvement over existing technology is one thing. Getting someone to pay for it is another. I remember reading about a vault constructed in Africa. A typical heavy bank vault door, but the vault itself made of sticks and mud. Or maybe it was cow dung.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Posts
    503
    Country: Bulgaria

    Default

    My father told the story of a strongroom in a factory where the thieves came in through the roof, which was simply the floor of the room above- boards underdrawn with plaster.

    I would want to see compelling evidence of such stories as most strongrooms, in my experience, are put in at the stipulation of an insurer, and they specify every one of the 6 surfaces.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Aberdeenshire
    Posts
    282
    Country: Great Britain

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Chubby View Post
    Sort of bumping this one a bit.

    Does anybody have any thoughts about block construction v poured construction?
    Hello again Chubby,
    The decision as to block v instu is really a matter for the structural engineer and architect and dependent on the the site situation, access, cost etc.
    The customer's requirements are linked to the Risk Assessment and can be adjusted either way by increasing the specification of thickness, compressive strength, additional protection such as the use of fibre or Wirand additives for additional tensile strength.
    One major consideration however is water tightness. A pre-cast block construction will never meet this requirement in basement installations. Another is quality control. Pre-cast blocks can be tested more effectively than cast on site concrete where cube tests have to be taken and tested for every mix long after the pour has taken place. Similarly the vibration of the mix for effective penetration of the reinforcement be more efficicienty carried out on individual blocks than in situ.
    Here endeth my thoughts.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Posts
    503
    Country: Bulgaria

    Default

    BTW, Doug, was the mud poured in situ, or preformed into blocks?

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Cleveland, Ohio USA
    Posts
    1,250
    Country: United States

    Default

    So it appears it was likely both mud and cow dung. After extensive research on the subject, the Massai favor a formed block of sorts for their homes. However, I suspect more of an intertwining of sticks to give the structural strength needed when the door is open. Wood has considerable strength when in tension. As to insurance, I doubt that was a consideration. And to think that vault even offered considerable fire protection. When in Rome...

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Posts
    503
    Country: Bulgaria

    Default

    Ah, a barrier material formed of several different materials fastened together. That sounds more of a John Tann design than a Chubb one to me. It was probably a prototype TDR, being "turd and dried rushes".

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    1,321
    Country: Wales

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Doug MacQueen View Post
    So it appears it was likely both mud and cow dung. After extensive research on the subject, the Massai favor a formed block of sorts for their homes. However, I suspect more of an intertwining of sticks to give the structural strength needed when the door is open. Wood has considerable strength when in tension
    The enhanced intertwining of sticks was possibly something like this old archive photo, although probably more for in-situ poured vaults and not intended for basic block construction. From an unknown installation marked as "walls prepared for 15-ton anti-lance treasury door".
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	image.jpeg 
Views:	5 
Size:	204.9 KB 
ID:	19046
    The inclusion of Turdbar reinforcement on some highest grade installations no doubt offered reassuring additional protection.

    Quote Originally Posted by Chubby View Post
    Ah, a barrier material formed of several different materials fastened together. That sounds more of a John Tann design than a Chubb one to me
    Sounds classic victorian John Tann, but for a specialised and specific market in today's world they'd possibly consider later generation barriers like Dungcrete III or IV.
    Last edited by Huw Eastwood; 19-12-17 at 12:02 AM.
    Huw

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Posts
    503
    Country: Bulgaria

    Default

    I know some people prefer a freestanding strongroom, so it can be observed from all round. That one seems to be ideal from that point of view.

    Actually talking of mud walls...... I once put a small SR in a location where the existing walls were adobe. They really were all over the place- corners were not square, walls ran off straight and vertical. So we put the block work in as specified- the blocks with 2 hollow squares in them, and then filled the hollows with a special mix. We had plenty of mix and so suggested filling the void between the adobe and the blockwork. It was anything from almost nothing up to 6" in places. The job was much better for it as the hole would have been a rat run.

    Normally I would never pour concrete against an existing wall as the wall would almost inevitably crack, but there is so much give in adobe that this wasn't a problem.

    As I sit here musing I just wonder what anybody thinks on existing walls. I was always told never to "use" an existing wall, or floor for that matter, but to build a wall to specification inside the existing. Of course it all depends what the customer orders.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •