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Thread: old still bank

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    72
    Country: Italy

    Default old still bank

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    So yesterday I went to a "vintage" street market, that is basically a luxury flea market, with my girlfriend. I noticed this still bank but pretended not to have seen it. I was worried she could get mad at me for buying that rusted and dirt piece of crap. Ironically she pointed it to me and said: look, that's cool... :roll:
    I immediately grabbed it and noticed the keyhole on the bottom was a bit ruined, but it was a nice piece nevertheless.
    I asked if they had a key and obviously they didn't. But the seller told me that for 10 euro it could be mine. I looked at my girlfriend with a fake interrogative expression, because I already made a decision, but she agreed and we bought it!
    The funny thing is that once at home she claimed it as hers, because she saw it. Well, I quickly made a "key" and gave it to her. Now, instead of being in a cabinet in the basement (my toys room), it's in the living room on a shelf!

    Sometimes life is fun 8)

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    6
    Country: United States

    Default

    great, you've got one great girlfriend

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    293
    Country: UK

    Default

    It's odd that something so solidly constructed has such a terrible lock!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    72
    Country: Italy

    Default

    Why you define it a terrible lock? The fact that I was able to pick it open doesn't means it's not a good lock.

    Keep in mind this was a piggy bank where kids put the change got from their parents, so there was no need for security. It was a very clever marketing invention, because only the bank had the key, so you saved some money and then you had to go there to get it open and... very likely you put the money on your kid bank account.

    Cheers

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    72
    Country: Italy

    Default

    I went to some Christmas markets in villages near our Garda lake and found another old money box. It's a bit rusted but for 10 euro one can't complain. Two nice things about this one: one of the keys I made for my others opened it at first try; There were some old coins in it. The coins are old Italian LIRE from 1954, 1955 and 1957 so I guess that was the period this still bank was used.
    There were a dozen used matches inside the box. Maybe a kid got bored and tried to burn it, or maybe they wanted to see what was inside it. Who knows?
    Anyway, enjoy the pictures.


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    I cleaned it with some "polish" (car wax sort of) and put it on display on the shelf.


    Cheers :)

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Edinburgh
    Posts
    214
    Country: UK

    Default

    Well-spotted, and well-picked. Mine took me a little longer.
    British banks also supplied similar home safes. Several were patented in the 1920's and 30's; older ones tend to be heavier. Most of mine have a 3-lever lock, some with bullet wards but most not. They continued to be offered into the 1950's. After that, banks more often sold something fancy, usually made in Finland and taking a simple standard double-bit key operating 2 springbolts.
    (Don't have one within reach now, but the mark is 'MK'.)

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    72
    Country: Italy

    Default

    Interesting. Now I'm curious to see pictures of yours...

    Cheers :)

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Edinburgh
    Posts
    214
    Country: UK

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by femurat View Post
    Interesting. Now I'm curious to see pictures of yours...

    Cheers :)
    I really ought to press on with photographing and listing mine — my executors won't have any idea what they are. I did start in the 1970's, and still have those file cards but didn't know much about items then.
    Sadly in my new house they are crammed into a cabinet ¼ the size they had in my old house, now I can't even see them all to count them. 'Fraid I don't have as much energy these days, and it will be quite a job to haul them out and photograph; and will they ever squeeze back in again?
    Don't get excited, there is little of great interest in my accumulation.
    However, meantime have a look at a page from Martins Bank archive
    http://www.martinsbank.co.uk/Children's%20Savings.htm
    I have several specimens of the top four type. There are minor variations, with a warded lock having 2 springbolts. I don't know how many differs there were but every one of mine differs. Some old bank might still have a key to their old Home Safes, but I've only once been lucky there.
    These, and the OP's style, can be found around Europe with many variations.
    This is a good antique dealer who handles locks, safes, moneyboxes ...
    http://www.belowstairs.co.uk/acatalog/
    used to be a subscriber when I edited the Newsletter.

    Several of my book-style homesafes have makers and patents on them, which I can look for on the Internet.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Edinburgh
    Posts
    214
    Country: UK

    Unhappy

    Incidentally, I have a British one somewhat similar to the OP's, only part of the bottom is the door, it's heavier, and has a double shutter inside which closes the coin slot if the safe is inverted. It's 3lever key does not fit any other I have

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    72
    Country: Italy

    Default

    Unfortunately I know what you mean when you say it will be quite a job to dig them out to take pictures. Don't worry.

    Thanks a lot for the very interesting links.

    Cheers :)

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