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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Seattle WA
    Posts
    1,325
    Country: United States

    Default

    Really Ilco and Silca both make blanks for quite a few of these locks. Like the one above the blank for push key locks are T131 Ilco.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    15
    Country: United States

    Default

    I think it worth about $250.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    110
    Country: United States

    Default

    Well, it has been a little over 3 years since I first posted this message... I still have the Corbin pancake lock. I have not tried to open the lock as I simply don't have the skills of a professional locksmith and I don't want to take the risk of damaging the lock.

    I have read about the tool Bob Dix developed for picking the pancake lock, called the "DIX-PIX", I have found 1 post about the tool. Apparently the tool is no longer produced/sold. One nice feature of the tool was that once you picked the lock, the depth gauges could be locked in place, allowing you to use the tool to create a new key. You can read about it here:

    *EDIT* Broken Link Removed

    I have not yet had time to search this forum for any of the names associated with the above article but the may be familiar to you: David Heuermann, Bob Dix, John T. Grist

    I'm still a bit puzzle as to why these Corbin pancake locks appear to be rare. Would any of you have documentation that could give a clue about why Corbin either produced these locks or ordered them from a third-party. If Corbin produced and sold them, they should be in a catalog somewhere. If it were for some some special event and the locks were custom ordered for commemorative purpose, that could explain why they are so rare today.

    I understand that in many cases, the answers to my questions are simply unavailable -- lost to history. But as you can see, I sometimes have a hard time letting go of things...

    Any guidance here is appreciated. Thank you.
    Last edited by Huw Eastwood; 31-01-19 at 05:45 PM. Reason: Broken link removed

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    597
    Country: United States

    Default Pancake lock "Corbin Cabinet Lock Co" - Rare?

    There has been new tool to pick these pancake padlock as some locksmith make there own tool to get it to pick. I have make my own tool to get these lock open. There is one locksmith "Lauren" as he did make his own tool and once in awhile he sell them. He also has two book out of how he make key for any padlock....Timothy......

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Mid Michigan
    Posts
    139
    Country: United States

    Default

    Perhaps when P&F Corbin and Russell & Erwin got together in 1902, Corbin used their production line to make these. R & E had been making push key locks for some time with sexy tooled cases. The expense of R & E's extra quality and designs may have led to a quick stop of their idea of getting into this style. Miller was surely making them at less cost and that was becoming the market demand.

    I've got one of Bob's pix and it is a helpful tool. It's only opened a few all on its own for me, but does aid in picking the lock and works great on reading the key cuts once open.

    I love the tooled case look, and would appreciate a pm if, or when you decide to let it go.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    141
    Country: United States

    Default

    Bob still makes his tools.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Tonawanda, NY, USA
    Posts
    808
    Country: United States

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Timothy View Post
    There has been new tool to pick these pancake padlock as some locksmith make there own tool to get it to pick. I have make my own tool to get these lock open. There is one locksmith "Lauren" as he did make his own tool and once in awhile he sell them. He also has two book out of how he make key for any padlock....Timothy......
    Lauren Atndt's The Extreme Padlock Collector has instructions for making such a tool, sold by Blurb.
    Last edited by Huw Eastwood; 31-01-19 at 05:46 PM. Reason: Broken Link removed

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Tecumseh, Michigan
    Posts
    12
    Country: United States

    Default crude picking tool

    I found and old pancake padlock metal detecting, It was a rusted blob. I cleaned it up good and painted it to stop the oxidation, I cut a small piece from a wire clothes hanger and put a 1/4 " 90 degree bend at the end. I then hammered it on a vise to get flat sides. With a lot of wd40 and patients, I was able to get the mechanism clean and with the improvised pick, I can open the lock and it will close to the locking position.


    Click image for larger version. 

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  9. #19
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    40
    Country: United States

    Default

    Some members here may have a copy of my book (THE EXTREME ANTIQUE PADLOCK COLLECTOR). These locks are easy to make keys for, and you don't have to be an old timer to do it.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    110
    Country: United States

    Default An update - oh happy day!

    I want to provide an update on the latest about my Corbin pancake lock. First, let me thank all the antique-locks.com members who replied to me thread. Your comments, however small are greatly appreciated. Because I am not a locksmith and only recently became capable of SPP'ing my way out of a wet paper bag (breaking 3 nice picks in the process), I appreciate having a place to go wear most the members know more than I do. You all seem to have your specialties; the more I learn, the more I realize that I haven't learned even a fraction of what I'd like to.

    I would especially like to thank all of you who pointed me towards Lauren Arndt. After seeing some excerpts from his book, I realized that not only did I want a copy of his book ( The Extreme Padlock Collector) , but maybe, just maybe, if I explained my situation, Lauren might be able to make a key for the lock. He certainly was the real deal. At one point I had considered trying to learn to pick these pancake locks myself. But given the number of picks and locks I broke just to gain some minor ability with pin tumbler locks, it seemed extremely unwise to use the Corbin as my practice/learning lock. I've got a whole box of cheap pancake locks that would be much better for learning. The more I thought about it, the more I knew Lauren was who I wanted to do this - if he would consider doing it and if I could afford what he would ask for doing the job. I decided it was worth approaching him. The worst that could happen would be he would say that he was not interested in doing the work.

    We ended up speaking by phone and I found myself instantly at ease. He wanted to make sure I was aware that there are no guarantees with old locks. While the photos I posted showed a lock in what appeared to be excellent condition, and while I had tested each lever by carefully pressing with a pick through the keyhole, this was not the same as a proper inspection of the lock. Things can and do go wrong. I told him that I understood and that I was prepared for any outcome - but I was certain the if the lock was not broken internally, then Lauren could open the lock and make a new key. We came to an agreement on what he would charge for this service and I shipped the lock to him.

    He turned this around very quickly, keeping me informed at every step. I now have the lock back with a shiny new key. The key works like a charm - a my lock is whole once again. Originally I had planned to sell the lock. But with working key in hand, I am so delighted to have the lock restored to a functioning lock. I'm keeping this in my personal collection for the foreseeable future.

    I could not be happier with the work Lauren did here. I am grateful to both Lauren and to the members of this forum. Thank you all very, very much.

    Tim

    Oh yeah, the pictures. Of course. These first three were ones Lauren sent to me. I am posting them here with his permission. Just know they are his images:

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    The remainder are my photos:

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