Welcome to our world of Locks and Locksmiths (click logo or scroll down to view all):-
 www.Antique-Locks.com 
  
HoL
   COLTi
Or are you looking for modern, or recent past,
Keys, Locks or Safes.
keys, locks & safes
Industrial Archaeology of Locks HoL Museum
COLTi
  
Please support our forum sponsors where you can.
Researching locks from antiquity to the recent past.Maintaining a reference collection & archive.Today's scene and cutting edge developments.
Page 2 of 16 FirstFirst 123456789101112 ... LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 153
  1. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Frankfurt Main
    Posts
    705
    Country: Germany

    Default

    Are these pictures yours? If yes can you maybe scan them for better quality?

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    1,321
    Country: Wales

    Default

    Almost forgot-

    Dicey-

    Yes, feel free to show my necklace/pendant. Just mention where you saw it and get me some orders lol

    The chain is my daily stainless 'chunky' I wear, but the CFRB door pendant is something I made years ago-
    It's all machined from matching 316 stainless and took ages- index milling all the bolt holes around the door was a nightmare-
    It's tough stuff to work at the best of times but even more so in small sizes- You need to flood it with so much coolant you can't see what you're doing!

    It's a bit of fun though, even if most people wonder what the heck it is!

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    1,321
    Country: Wales

    Default

    I'm totally out of sync with these now lol.

    All the old black and white pics of the actual door are ones I've just trawled up over the years. wish I did have them in A4 size to enlarge etc, but unfortunately not.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Frankfurt Main
    Posts
    705
    Country: Germany

    Default

    Yes, feel free to show my necklace/pendant. Just mention where you saw it and get me some orders
    You made this yourself????
    This is sooooo coool :D

    Probably could not afford one though but one day I'll place an order!

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    1,223
    Country: United States

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MaxVaultage View Post
    The second pic is of what again is supposedly the CFRB door being machined at York's on the vertical turret lathe.
    I'd love to know how they machined the frame to match the door. If they could fit it on the same lathe while the tool holder was set at the same angle, that would make it easier. There is an interesting Hibbard patent (US 817,774) which describes a machine that will grind a door into its frame (lapping) for a very close fit.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Tavistock, Devon UK
    Posts
    562
    Country: Great Britain

    Default

    Hope they have a emergency door in case the main door jams. These door are really interesting would be great to see one close up. Would also have loved to been on the installation of one of these beasts.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Cleveland, Ohio USA
    Posts
    1,250
    Country: United States

    Default

    Here is the emergency door still in the factory. Quite a few years ago I knew a rigger who had worked on the installation with several of his brothers. He was the only one left. Doug
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Vault001.jpg  

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Frankfurt Main
    Posts
    705
    Country: Germany

    Default

    I get the impression that they still won't allow any photography at all, as apart from a couple of 'official' color pics the majority are old black and white shots from the 40s and 50s.
    Doug: You were not allowed to make pictures or? Are these black and white pics in your possession or did you just scan them? What did you do there? You can write a PM if you want.
    I was allowed to do pictures at the Kromer factory (I believe I was the first one that was allowed to take pictures). I am not allowed to publish pictures though. I am writing an article on the factories history atm and I will show some pictures in the article but I have to ask permission for each picture. All pictures are saved on a highly encrypted USB Stick (Kingston DT6000) and all traces of the pictures on my computer have been cleaned to NSA standard. The computer was not connected to the Internet while transfer.

    Max: Is the door on my picture the same? Still waiting on the scans of theses 2 emergency door pics :)

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Cleveland, Ohio USA
    Posts
    1,250
    Country: United States

    Default

    I did take a few pictures years ago but have never been able to find them. Some pictures I have are from the brochure put out when the bank was first built. Then others, the three recently posted, are from the archives at the bank. Doug

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    1,321
    Country: Wales

    Default

    wylk- thanks so much for posting those videos- I'd never have guessed in a million years that there was any 'official' footage like that!!

    Totally amazing to see that CFRB door being opened and closed!

    Loved the last minute wipe down of the bottom of the frame with a mop before they close it!

    Those videos are well worth a look if anyone else hasn't seen them- A real blast back into the old days of banking- I loved the cheque (or check) counter machines! All mechanical fabricated metal before plastic and electronics took over- great stuff.

    You mentioned the machining of the frame- I don't know for sure but would imagine they were turned on the same big vertical mills (or lathes- both terms are used for those big verticals).
    In all of the pics of doors I've seen being turned there is always extra capacity on the machine capable of taking the frame. As a 'bare' casting without any fixtures or attachments the frame would fit comfortably on the table and any irregularities in weight distribution balanced until equal. The rotational speeds on sizes of that diameter are of course very very low compared to everyday turning on small horizontal center lathes.

    On the same subject, here's another-

    Consider some of the massive RECTANGULAR doors that were made with as many as 5 or 6 tapered steps and radiused curved corners.

    Being rectangular obviously eliminates turning, which by it's nature of process creates circular and concentric parts. Set the angle on the top-slide, tool post or carriage etc and you get matching tapers like wylk said. Any of you guys that do your own machining will understand the difficulties with a rectangular door! Milling the matching frames by horizontal passes with milling cutters inside the frame when it's stepped, tapered and has radiused internal corners must have really had those guys scratching their heads a bit........

    Great thread guys-

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •