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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    3
    Country: Great Britain

    Default For sale: Chubb Strongroom door

    Hi

    If you are looking at this, then you will know what it is - and how heavy it is!

    Door and Frame with bolts, brackets etc. Handle turns freely to close bolts, One key available but locks do not work.

    Will be sat on a pallet for loading (forklift may be available at cost)

    Offers invited, collection only.
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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    60
    Country: UK

    Default

    If the locks do not work it may be because the locks have detectors in them, to reset the detectors, insert the key and turn as to lock the lock again and then try to unlock it.

    If it's a detector lock you might get more interest in the door if you post some pics of the interior of the locks, sometimes pictures tell a thousand words especially to the condition of the mechanism which is paramount to collectors.

    Cheers

    Kit

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    3
    Country: Great Britain

    Default

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    The safe door has been dated to 1892 by the serial number - thanks Peter!

    These are the locks. As you can see, there is only one key and it is so worn / broken that it doesn't work.

    Would be interested in any comments from the experts!

    regards

    TT
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  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    60
    Country: UK

    Default

    From what I know the "Chubb's Patent" lock is a gunpowder proof lock and not a detector, this would have been typical of Chubb at this time period as this was the most common means for a safecracker to crack a safe or vault.

    The second lock I don't know anything about, I strongly doubt it is a Chubb, Perhaps replaced at some point in the early part of the last century by a safe engineer that wasn't from Chubb, Chubb would have had their products visibly marked with their name as it became a household brand throughout the 1800's, the key is not the original to that lock unless a piece has been broken off from it, the bit just looks far too short for a safe key and the cuts are too small and not enough of them, the interior of the locks would give us a better picture.

    Don't be afraid to open them, the mechanism won't burst out of the case in any way whatsoever and in the remote chance that it does it won't be difficult to piece it back together.

    I would advise you to get replacement keys cut as this can add to the value to either the locks or the door.

    regards

    Kit

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Tavistock, Devon UK
    Posts
    562
    Country: Great Britain

    Default

    I think the second lock is also Chubb and as you say Kit that is not the key for it. I have a extended bolt version of this lock that was nicknamed the Banjo lock and is I believe a early version of the 6K75. the version I have is a Pin Key and not a pipe key and is also a 7 lever lock. I am guessing if you put this lock in the locked position you would see a Chubb trade mark. Here you can see the trade mark on the end of the bolthead. My lock no longer as the hardened plate these were attached directly to the lock. You can see the locating holes diagonally opposite each other then two tapped holes either side of the keyhole that were used to keep the plate in place.
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    Last edited by Ian D. Lewis; 11-07-13 at 08:36 PM.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    3
    Country: Great Britain

    Default

    Ian is right - I only just noticed that the serial number, name and fish logo are engraved in the face of the bolt (see photo). This lock is numbered 12474312 and the other (older?) rectangular one is 1242756, this also carries the 128 Queen Victoria St address.

    There is only the one key, for the round lock with key pin, and it looks badly worn and doesn't fully operate the lock.

    regards
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    TT

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