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  1. #31
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    1,265
    Country: United States

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    Here's a noteworthy vault door I have added to my "catalog." This is in Providence, Rhode Island. The former home of the Industrial Trust Company (1927/1928), then Bank of America until earlier this year, the building is now vacant which makes viewing difficult at best assuming it's locked up tight while awaiting its future. I did find an image of a vault door presumably for safe deposit boxes and was astounded by its apparent thickness.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Industrial Trust - Providence RI.jpg 
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    I am presuming this is a York door based on the frame-mounted controls that look like other York (and Remington-Sherman, which was acquired by York) doors. The building is at 111 Westminster Street and is nicknamed the "Superman Building" because it looks like the Daily Planet building in the old TV show (which was really the Los Angeles city hall). This image is from http://www.providencejournal.com/top...?ssimg=1024003.

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devon UK
    Posts
    3,013
    Country: UK

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    incredible door!

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Gilbert, AZ 85298
    Posts
    275
    Country: United States

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    Quote Originally Posted by wylk View Post
    OK, let me know when you get them and are done looking them over.
    I received the Mosler brochures the other day. There is a lot of great information! If you PM me an address I will put them in next week's mail.

    Contents (13 Items):
    1-1/2" Vault Door No. LD-1-1/2 Flat Sill (April 1950 blue brochure, 6 pgs) assuming LD = Light Duty
    3-1/2" Vault Door No. LD-3-1/2 Flat Sill (August 1954 blue brochure, 6 pgs, exposed boltwork)
    3-1/2" Vault Door No. LD-3-1/2 Flat Sill (April 1960 black and white brochure, 6 pgs, concealed boltwork)
    3-1/2" Vault Door No. LD-3-1/2 Flat Sill (After 1960 brown and white brochure, 6 pgs, concealed boltwork and modern hinge, 2 separate plans)
    7" Vault Door No. 2807 Flat Sill (May 1950 green brochure, 6 pgs, smooth door edge)
    7" Vault Door No. 4807 Flat Sill (May 1950 red brochure, 6 pgs, stepped door edge)
    10" Vault Door No. 2810 Flat Sill (May 1953, green brochure, 6 pgs)
    10" Emergency Door No. RE-310 (December 1951, red brochure, 6 pgs)
    16" Emergency Door No. RE-316 (December 1951, red brochure, 6 pgs)
    2 Hour Insulated Flat Sill Vault Door (March 1959, blue and white brochure, 4 pgs, double doors)
    4 Hour Insulated Flat Sill Vault Door (March 1959, blue and white brochure, 4 pgs, single door)
    6 Hour Insulated Flat Sill Vault Door (March 1959, blue and white brochure, 4 pgs, single door)
    Century Vault Ventilator No. 5-A (April 1958, red and white brochure, 4 pgs)

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Gilbert, AZ 85298
    Posts
    275
    Country: United States

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    I found an interesting pic here of the former Irwin Union Bank and Trust vault that has holes in the jamb to accept the locking bolts.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Locking Bolt Holes in Jamb.jpg 
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ID:	10347

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Gilbert, AZ 85298
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    275
    Country: United States

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    Quote Originally Posted by wylk View Post
    As long as we're talking about Holmes, here is a photo:

    Attachment 10060
    Here is an interesting article Holmes wrote titled "The Design and Construction of Modern Bank Vaults" that appeared in Bank Buildings by The Architectural Review in March, 1905.

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    1,265
    Country: United States

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    I found another impressive door:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	20 Pine NYC 2.jpg 
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ID:	10398

    This is 20 Pine Street in NYC (Manhattan), once the Chase National Bank Building (1928, 38 floors), later Two Chase Manhattan Plaza, now merely 20 Pine consisting of residential condominiums. See http://www.emporis.com/building/20pi...orkcity-ny-usa and http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/...80254190220750 from which this image is taken, and http://www.multihousingnews.com/news...004047749.html. The vault has been converted into a pool.

    Probably a York door based on the frame-mounted controls (with the handwheel missing). I can't tell for sure but the image suggests the door has been painted, possibly to inhibit rust from the humidity and chlorine vapors of the pool.

  7. #37
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    Dec 2009
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    1,265
    Country: United States

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    Here's an image and article on a vault I knew existed but had not found any pictures. One Chase Manhattan Plaza in New York:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Chase Manhattan Bank 2a.JPG 
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ID:	10406

    The Mosler Century door is 45 tons and 20 inches thick (assuming they didn't photograph one of the 35-ton doors).

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Gilbert, AZ 85298
    Posts
    275
    Country: United States

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ryan Krakowsky View Post
    The vault at 120 Broadway in NYC was engineered by Holmes, and built by York.
    Doesn't having a periscope and exposed numbered dials defeat the purpose? Most remote combination locks I've seen have blank dials...

  9. #39
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    1,265
    Country: United States

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    Quote Originally Posted by VaultDoors View Post
    Doesn't having a periscope and exposed numbered dials defeat the purpose? Most remote combination locks I've seen have blank dials...
    A good point, and thanks for spotting the incongruity. From available images it looks like there is a wall just to the right of the control "pod". A spy would have to stand right next to the operator to see the dials, which would seem unlikely as long as the operator(s) know of the danger. The numbered dials might have been a backup in case the light bulb inside the mechanism burned out?

  10. #40
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    Nov 2013
    Location
    Gilbert, AZ 85298
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    Quote Originally Posted by wylk View Post
    A good point, and thanks for spotting the incongruity. From available images it looks like there is a wall just to the right of the control "pod". A spy would have to stand right next to the operator to see the dials, which would seem unlikely as long as the operator(s) know of the danger. The numbered dials might have been a backup in case the light bulb inside the mechanism burned out?
    ...and it has similar pins as the One King West remote combo.

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