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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
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    USA
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    Country: United States

    Default Beard & Brother Type 3 Time Lock

    Needless to say I was thrilled to read John Erroll's comments (posted in the 'Unknown Type' thread) about my lock this AM. I also now have a reason to get back into contact with the Miller collection with my closeup, in-focus pix for comparison with their lock. Hopefully I can get comparison pix from them for authentication purposes.

    I have two questions relating to my present situation:

    1. How does a collector go about establishing a value on an item when only one other is known to exist & that one is locked up in a collection? The reasons for this are both establishing a value for insurance purposes & as a basis for negotiating a selling price.

    2. As I have no real affection for inanimate objects, how do I go about finding & contacting collectors who would be interested in purchasing this lock?

    I suppose the answer to question one is 'whatever another collector is willing to pay for it.' Without some kind of benchmark reference figure, though, I would be hesitant to list it on eBay even with a substantial reserve figure.

    Any inputs on this would be appreciated. Thanks!

    Jack

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
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    73
    Country: United States

    Default Type 3

    Did I tell you what a rotten guy you are lately?

  3. #3
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    USA
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    Country: United States

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jacobrules View Post
    Did I tell you what a rotten guy you are lately?
    Nothing personal on my end, but aren't auctions wonderful? Especially those involving folks who have no idea what they're selling & those who have little idea what they're bidding on. eBay should have a special category for these!

    Let me remind you that you were the one who had deciphered BEARD'S from those out-of-focus pix. I thought I was bidding on a Mosler 1887 type. So the advantage was yours, not mine. I'm a time lock neophyte by comparison to you, I believe. But while we're talking about clocks, even one that doesn't work at all is correct twice a day. It looks like I just got lucky.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Cleveland, Ohio USA
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    1,238
    Country: United States

    Default

    I'm just curious, Jack. What did John say when you told him you thought "American Genius" was just a flashy coffee table book? Doug

  5. #5
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    Jul 2011
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Doug MacQueen View Post
    I'm just curious, Jack. What did John say when you told him you thought "American Genius" was just a flashy coffee table book? Doug
    As that was another topic it wasn't brought up. My criticism of the contents of his book was meant to be scholarly in nature, not personal. His reading of the nature of my lock was likewise meant to be scholarly & not personal. His book is still an invaluable reference work & is at my left wrist on my desk as I type this.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Cleveland, Ohio USA
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    Default

    So then we'll just call it an "invaluable flashy coffee table reference book" and leave it at that, okay. I had a feeling that as you got deeper into the timelock section, which also happens to be the authors forte, you would find greater attention to detail, especially so now that you are actually using it in helping you gain a better understanding of the subject. Doug
    Last edited by Doug MacQueen; 14-11-11 at 01:01 PM.

  7. #7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Doug MacQueen View Post
    So then we'll just call it an "invaluable flashy coffee table reference book" and leave it at that, okay. I had a feeling that as you got deeper into the timelock section, which also happens to be the authors forte, you would find greater attention to detail, especially so now that you are actually using it in helping you gain a better understanding of the subject. Doug
    +1

    He was very dismissive and critial of the author and then he edited all of his posts to remove most of the offensive stuff where he personally attacks the author. Instead of just offering up the helpful information about the errors, he unnecessarily criticized the author repeatedly.

    I mean god forbid a 368 page book has some errors, right! That's like completely unheard of because we all know everything should be perfect! You mean the footnote referred to the wrong patent? Oh the travesty!!! How dare they not be perfect!! It's not like the authors are busy with other things and can't devote 100% of their time to repeatedly check the book for errors.

    Perhaps they wanted to make a book to tell the world about some interesting looks that would be as accurate as possible with the limited resources and time that they had. Most people (who have lives and don't spend all their time criticizing others and trying to tear down their work) would agree that it's a very good book.

  8. #8
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    Jul 2011
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    USA
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    133
    Country: United States

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by thelockcollector View Post
    +1

    He was very dismissive and critial of the author and then he edited all of his posts to remove most of the offensive stuff where he personally attacks the author. Instead of just offering up the helpful information about the errors, he unnecessarily criticized the author repeatedly.
    This is totally untrue & was never my intent. I have no control over what you may have read into it, though. I thought most subscribers here appreciated my efforts as it made the book that much more useful to them. The large number of times that that thread has been viewed is proof of that.

    Now, if you don't mind, could we allow this thread to get back on topic 'Beard & Brother Type 3 Time Lock' please? There must be other areas of this forum where you can post literary criticism.

  9. #9
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    Jul 2011
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    Country: United States

    Default Beard & Brother Type 3 vs Mosler 1978

    Attached are 3 photos that I just received from Barbara Craycraft at the Miller collection in Nicholasville, KY. Her statement:

    These are the photos—as you can see the only difference is the inscription being Mosler rather than Beard.



    She also told me that Beard & Bro. sold time locks to Mosler bearing the Mosler name instead of Beard.


    The tentative conclusion I have come to is that my lock is perhaps the unique example of the Beard & Brother Type 3 - a Mosler 1878 with the Beard imprint & perhaps some differences in the door & key/latch.


    Jack
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails mosler_7126b.jpg   mosler_7128b.jpg   mosler_7132b.jpg  

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    73
    Country: United States

    Default Type 3

    No offense intended, I'm just jealous. It's my own fault I should have been in it for more but you just keep getting so darn lucky on this one.

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